The DASH diet was created when researchers were looking for ways to effectively reduce hypertension, but this was over 20 years ago! Though it’s still often marketed as a treatment for high blood pressure, the DASH eating plan is really an ideal way to eat for overall health, weight maintenance, and chronic disease prevention. In fact, studies suggest that DASH lowers risk for heart disease, type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome, and some cancers.

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Yancy WS Jr, Westman EC, McDuffie JR, Grambow SC, Jeffreys AS, Bolton J, Chalecki A, Oddone EZ, “A randomized trial of a low-carbohydrate diet vs orlistat plus a lowfat diet for weight loss,” Arch Intern Med. 2010 Jan 25;170(2):136-45. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20101008?itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum&ordinalpos=2.
Eating low-carb paleo means removing items like rice, pasta, and legumes from your diet completely, but the carbs you eat will be from vegetables like fruit, beets, sweet potatoes, and leafy greens, such as spinach and kale. The diet also cuts out processed food plus foods allowed on other low-carb diets, including milk and cheese, and some people have an easier time sticking with the diet when more carbs are included.
Think of it as intermittent fasting 2.0 – only a bit more complicated. Ready? Here goes. There are three windows: one to get you started, one to help you reach your goal weight and a maintenance plan. You eat within a 12-hour, 14-hour or 16-hour window depending on which phase you’re in. But what you eat counts, too. The ‘green light’ lists of foods changes with every phase. Still there?

Yancy WS, Olsen MK, Guyton JR, Bakst RP, Westman EC; “A Low-Carbohydrate, Ketogenic Diet versus a Low-Fat Diet To Treat Obesity and Hyperlipidemia: A Randomized, Controlled Trial” (2004) Annals of Internal Medicine 140(10): 769-777. Accessed 6/4/2018 https://annals.org/aim/fullarticle/717451/low-carbohydrate-ketogenic-diet-versus-low-fat-diet-treat-obesity
Sautéed carrots and onions. Sauté 1 medium onion, thinly sliced, in 1 tablespoon olive oil or canola oil. Add about 8 ounces sliced carrots, and continue to sauté until the carrots are soft. Add 1 thin pat of butter at the end. (Hints: Top the turkey with the sautéed carrots for extra flavor. If you like very soft carrots, microwave first before sautéing.)
The diet that brought ‘lectins’ into the mainstream - a plant-based protein found in the likes of legumes (lentils and beans), nightshade veg (tomatoes, potatoes and aubergine), eggs and grains. The man who popularised the lectin-free diet – Dr Steven Gundry – describes them as ‘toxic’. In his book that brought a lectin-free lifestyle to the masses – The Plant Paradox – he cites them as the source of modern ailments from obesity to gastrointestinal disorders.
When you’re eating the foods that get you there (more on that in a minute), your body can enter a state of ketosis in one to three days, she adds. During the diet, the majority of calories you consume come from fat, with a little protein and very little carbohydrates. Ketosis also happens if you eat a very low-calorie diet — think doctor-supervised, only when medically recommended diets of 600 to 800 total calories.
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