I'm going to give the DASH diet a try. It sounds easy enough but haven't actually tried it yet. I enjoyed the book and am anxious to start the plan. I don't necessarily agree with the artificial sweeteners used. The book does have some good recipes that I want to try. I do think it's a good basic diet that you can adapt to fit your likes and needs. And as always including exercise with a diet will always help. This will hopefully help to accomplish one of my goal for the new year.

Another study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 2008, assigned 322 moderately obese adults to one of three diets: calorie-restricted low-fat; calorie-restricted Mediterranean; and non-calorie-restricted low-carb. After two years, the Mediterranean group had lost an average of 9 7/10 pounds; the low-fat group, 6 4/10 pounds; and the low-carb group, 10 3/10 pounds. Although weight loss didn't differ greatly between the low-carb and Mediterranean groups, both lost appreciably more than the low-fat group did.

A systematic review in 2018 looked at sixteen studies on the ketogenic diet in adults. It concluded that the treatment was becoming more popular for that group of patients, that the efficacy in adults was similar to children, the side effects relatively mild. However, many patients gave up with the diet, for various reasons, and the quality of evidence inferior to studies on children. Health issues include high levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high total cholesterol, and weight loss.[23]
Yancy WS, Olsen MK, Guyton JR, Bakst RP, Westman EC; “A Low-Carbohydrate, Ketogenic Diet versus a Low-Fat Diet To Treat Obesity and Hyperlipidemia: A Randomized, Controlled Trial” (2004) Annals of Internal Medicine 140(10): 769-777. Accessed 6/4/2018 https://annals.org/aim/fullarticle/717451/low-carbohydrate-ketogenic-diet-versus-low-fat-diet-treat-obesity
The Johns Hopkins Hospital protocol for initiating the ketogenic diet has been widely adopted.[42] It involves a consultation with the patient and their caregivers and, later, a short hospital admission.[18] Because of the risk of complications during ketogenic diet initiation, most centres begin the diet under close medical supervision in the hospital.[9]
I don't think this is the same as the DASH diet that was developed by the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute. That diet is more common sense than this Atkins rip off. The DASH diet was developed to prevent high blood pressure. It consists of eating more fruits, veggies, and whole grains and avoiding excess salt. This book is not that diet. I hate diets that eliminate foods even if only for two weeks.
If you’re on a quest to jumpstart weight loss, why not kick your metabolism into overdrive by sneaking spicy foods into your diet. Capsaicin, the active ingredient in cayenne pepper that gives it its spiciness, revs up your metabolism in a way that’s conducive to weight loss. In fact, according to a study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, those who supplemented their diet with capsaicin consumed 200 fewer calories during their next meal.
Forget old low-carb diet plans that focused on processed protein bars and shakes. This year, the keto diet got high marks for low carb. Keto, short for "ketogenic," is all about training the body to burn fat for fuel. How? By eating fat—and lots of it. Most keto diets recommend getting at least 70 percent of your daily calories from fat and the rest from protein. The goal is to eat as few carbohydrates as possible. Proponents say it helps them drop weight fast with little or no hunger in addition to perks like more energy and mental clarity. (Interested? Here's everything you need to know about the keto diet.)
And while the diet wasn't designed with weight loss as a primary goal, it's no secret that many of the nutritional factors that influence blood pressure also influence weight, she says. Think: processed foods, trans fats, and excess sugar. According to one DASH study, adults who who followed the diet lost more weight in a span of eight to 24 weeks than those adhering to other low-calorie diets. (Kick-start your new, healthy routine with The Woman's Guide to Strength Training!)
With any healthy diet in moderation, weight loss is an achievable goal, as long as you reduce caloric intake, eat a balanced selection of nutritious foods, and get ample exercise. The Mediterranean diet is comprised of a diverse set of delicious ingredients, making it an easy diet to stick to. As it's full of fiber and good fats, the Mediterranean diet supports satiety, which can help you reduce caloric intake, supporting weight loss and management.
In her book, Susan highlights one of the major problems with dinner time today: quality time. Does everyone else remember when dinner time was family time? When we would all sit down together, share our day, talk, laugh, and leave when the meal was done? Susan and I shared our childhood dinning experiences when we discussed her call for embracing the the Mediterranean lifestyle — incorporating exercise, relaxation, and family meals back into our daily routines. This book is looking for someone who is looking to make a lifestyle choice. The way that you eat, sitting down with your families at the dinner table. No more meals on the go, no more meals with the TV. I wanted to bring back the importance of food in our households,” noted Susan.
Many dieters shy away from nuts because of their high calorie and fat count. But studies show that eating a handful several times a week can prevent heart disease and ultimately help you shed pounds since they fill you up and stop you from snacking on other things. Almonds, in particular, contain lots of monounsaturated fats and fiber. (Healthy swap: Replace peanut butter with almond butter.)
Elena Paravantes, RDN is a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist, Writer and consultant specializing in the Greek Mediterranean Diet and Cuisine. She has been active as a clinician, consultant and lecturer for 20 years, both in the U.S. and Greece. An expert on the Greek Mediterranean Diet, her interviews and articles have been published in many publications including CNN, U.S. News and World Report, Prevention, NPR, and Shape. Elena has collaborated with a number of organizations including Loyola University, Yale University, University of Missouri, Louisiana State University, and the American College of Greece.

Check the nutrition labels on all your products to see if they’re high in carbs. There are hidden carbs in the unlikeliest of places (like ketchup and canned soups). Try to avoid buying products with dozens of incomprehensible ingredients. Less is usually healthier.Always check the serving sizes against the carb counts. Manufacturers can sometimes recommend inconceivably small serving sizes to seemingly reduce calorie and carb numbers.


Grains and beans are high in lectins, and it’s no surprise that the top allergen foods also have a high lectin content. The lectins in nightshade vegetables can be troublesome for some people, while others handle them just fine. Cooking and peeling removes some of the lectin content in vegetables (but not grains, they’re pretty heat stable), but some super-sensitive people have to avoid them completely.
Thank you for this info. I will be copying the link to send to some folks ready to jump on this new trend. In fact I had a resident (I am a CDM) come in to our re-hab facility in pretty bad shape. He was unable to speak with me so I spoke with his wife. The man had come in after having a TIA. He was a diabetic, as well. The wife told me that she had her husband 9and herself) on a keto diet. When she saw the size my eyes got for some reason she got angry and very defensive and screamed “Forget everything you have been taught. It is all crap”. I understand when folks are worried abut their loved ones they can get pretty emotional. I asked my standard question about chew/swallowing, UBW and food allergies and quickly left. I spoke with the RD (a CDE) about what had happened. She tried to speak with the resident and his wife and got the same treatment. The RD said to me “He will have another stroke in a week”. He had one in 3 days. Unfortunately with this stroke, he got anew diagnosis of severe dysphagia. SLP tried and tried but he would aspirate on everything. He had to be pegged. He was brought back to the facility. The wife was taught how to feed him through the tube. He left the facility and passed quietly about 3 weeks later. I reached out to the wife on his second stay and we became fairly close. She said she thought she was doing the best thing for him because he was over weight. I get it. She only wanted a healthy husband. She apologized for being so quick when we met. I thanked her for actually educating me on this diet. I was not aware there was such a thing.
Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders after stroke,[7] and affects at least 50 million people worldwide.[8] It is diagnosed in a person having recurrent unprovoked seizures. These occur when cortical neurons fire excessively, hypersynchronously, or both, leading to temporary disruption of normal brain function. This might affect, for example, the muscles, the senses, consciousness, or a combination. A seizure can be focal (confined to one part of the brain) or generalised (spread widely throughout the brain and leading to a loss of consciousness). Epilepsy may occur for a variety of reasons; some forms have been classified into epileptic syndromes, most of which begin in childhood. Epilepsy is considered refractory (not yielding to treatment) when two or three anticonvulsant drugs have failed to control it. About 60% of patients will achieve control of their epilepsy with the first drug they use, whereas about 30% do not achieve control with drugs. When drugs fail, other options include epilepsy surgery, vagus nerve stimulation and the ketogenic diet.[7]
Spinach is a great source of iron, which is a key component in red blood cells that fuel our muscles with oxygen for energy. But researchers in Sweden identified another way in which these greens might keep you charged: Compounds found in spinach actually increase the efficiency of our mitochondria, the energy-producing factories inside our cells. That means eating a cup of cooked spinach a day may give you more lasting power on the elliptical machine (or in your daily sprint to catch the bus).
I do have a couple of questions. I’m not vegan, but is there room for tempeh (as an alternative)? I love yogurt but I also love cottage cheese – would that be allowed and what about green tea or organic matcha? Oh, one more question, after doing weight watchers, I became obsessed with weighing my food and watching my portion sizes. When I was an unhealthy eater that was my downfall. I’ve mainly been trying to eat clean for the last year, but I still weigh/measure my food. What is the rule for portion sizes in the mediterranean lifestyle? Sorry for all the questions, but thank you for your time!! I look forward to trying all your recipes.

I would love to join a study! Could you recommend where to go to find one? I have done 30 or less total carbs a day for almost 2 years and feel great. I have NEVER EVEN ONCE gone over 40 total so I do follow it and I do not cheat on high carb foods, although I do occasionally over-eat on low carb foods resulting in a bit over 30 maybe 1 -2 times a month. I do feel that time will provide more support and think that the medical community should educate on this as another alternative. It isn’t for everyone because it is a bit more problematic if a person does fall of the straight and narrow too often but it can be done!


Hello everyone. I was diagnosed as a diabetic in 2010. I followed the ADA diet while taking metformin and lnsulin and could never get by glucose readings below 135. Most mornings it was at 175 or higher. In mid 2017 I had to find a new doctor. I ran out of meds in Semtember of that year but could not find a doctor due to not accepting new patients and or my health insurance. I broke my foot at work on the last workday in December. Was instructed to stay off foot for 6 to 9 months . In the mean time I finally got to see my new family practitioner on March 28 2018. Represcribed meds and ordered blood work. A1c was ar 14.1. With my new glucose meter my readings were 375. Due to basically being bedridden while my foot heals I was concerned about diabetic complications an weight gain as I was already overweight. After doing research online I learned about the keto diet. I began the diet on 3/29 /2018 along with intermittent fasting. I weighed 265#. As of 4/26/2008 I am at 245#. My glucose readings have been on average 73 to 98 and a couple of times 111. I stopped all my medication about a week ago just to see if they would increase. They have not so far and I check 4 times daily. I sleep better and do not crave sweets. I feel full . The first two weeks were tough but now I can go 2-3 days without being hungry. I am looking forward to the results of my next blood test in June. This diet fits my circumstances and I do plan on to exercise when I am able to. I want to reach my weight to height ratio also. When I achieve this goal I may tweak my diet at that time but for right now that is what is working for me. I may never be able to eat some of the things I used to but considering the complications of diabetes it is one hell of incentive for willpower to stay on the diet.I will repost again after my next blood test or if there are any significant changes.
Although white potatoes offer some potassium and fiber, sweet potatoes reign supreme in the nutrition department, meaning you should consider adding sweet potatoes to your diet. A large sweet potato contains around 4 grams of satiety-boosting protein, 25 percent of the day’s belly-filling fiber, and 11 times the recommended daily intake of vitamin A. What’s more? It’s less than 200 calories.
– When eating the Mediterranean way, you’ll notice that we don’t eliminate any food groups. But we do rely more on vegetables, fruits, legumes and grains to supply more of what we eat. We also eat mostly lean proteins. So with that, if eating tempeh or other soy-based foods or if drinking green tea is something you enjoy, then that is up to you…and I would again encourage figuring that out with an RD or someone who can better assess your specific needs and advice you accordingly.
If you’re looking to get a jump start on your health and fitness goals this year, you may be thinking about trying the ketogenic diet. Maybe you’ve heard the phrase before — it’s a huge diet buzzword — but aren’t sure what it means. Here’s a primer: The ketogenic diet is an eating plan that drives your body into ketosis, a state where the body uses fat as a primary fuel source (instead of carbohydrates), says Stacey Mattinson, RDN, who is based in Austin, Texas.
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