But the best part about the Mediterranean diet isn't that it's a concrete plan or dedicated to helping you drop pounds; rather, it's a way of eating that incorporates healthy fats, lots of fresh produce, and whole grains. Translation: You can do it for your entire life and never feel like you're actually dieting. (In fact, studies show you can lose weight on the Mediterranean diet without cutting any calories.)
Cyrus Khambatta earned a PhD in Nutritional Biochemistry from UC Berkeley after being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in his senior year of college at Stanford University in 2002. He is an internationally recognized nutrition and fitness coach for people living with type 1, type 1.5, prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, and has helped hundreds of people around the world achieve exceptional insulin sensitivity by adopting low-fat, plant-based whole foods nutrition.
The basal metabolic rate per gram of body weight is seven times greater in mice than in humans. Organisms with large mass-specific metabolic rates typically show relatively large deviations from "normal" values because of a weak capacity to maintain homeostasis. Mice, which have a higher mass-specific metabolic rate, have a weak capacity to maintain cellular homeostasis; humans have a lower mass-specific metabolic rate, and a strong capacity to maintain cellular homeostasis. Mice are not small people, and "everyone else did it" is not a sound experimental design rationale.
One of the most important ingredients is abundant physical activity. The base of the Mediterranean diet is an abundance of fresh fruits, vegetables, olive oil, beans, nuts, legumes, and whole grains. Next, add in fish and seafood at least twice a week, followed by some poultry, eggs, and dairy, especially fermented dairy like yogurt and cheese. The very top of the pyramid is reserved for a small amount of red meat and sugary treats (in small portions and for special occasions).
“We have basically no evidence that this diet is consistent with human health over time,” says Dr. Katz. (Its heavy emphasis on animal protein isn’t ecologically sustainable, either, he adds.) “All of the evidence we have points toward a plant-predominant diet with an emphasis on vegetables, whole grains, fruits, nuts, and seeds—all of the very things that the ketogenic diet avoids.”

Gary D. Foster, Ph.D., Holly R. Wyatt, M.D., James O. Hill, Ph.D., Brian G. McGuckin, Ed.M., Carrie Brill, B.S., B. Selma Mohammed, M.D., Ph.D., Philippe O. Szapary, M.D., Daniel J. Rader, M.D., Joel S. Edman, D.Sc., and Samuel Klein, M.D., “A Randomized Trial of a Low-Carbohydrate Diet for Obesity — NEJM,” N Engl J Med 2003; 348:2082- 2090. http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa022207.

Lots of apps and websites offer keto diet challenges—basically, a blueprint for the keto diet with a fixed starting and ending point (they typically last for a week to a month, though some may be longer). Speaking of apps, plenty of keto-centric ones are right at your fingertips (a.k.a., your smartphone), like the KetoDiet app, which can help you calculate your macros and track your keto diet effectively.
At your favorite Greek restaurant, order lamb souvlaki. Have a bar-of-soap-size amount of lamb (or chicken if you prefer) and a baseball-size amount of couscous or rice. Go ahead and eat all of the vegetables that come with your order, and if there is a salad, top it with 1 tablespoon of dressing. Package up the remaining lamb and rice or couscous for Sunday's lunch. Serve with 1/2 glass (2 ounces) of wine.
On a ketogenic diet, your entire body switches its fuel supply to run mostly on fat, burning fat 24-7. When insulin levels become very low, fat burning can increase dramatically. It becomes easier to access your fat stores to burn them off. This is great if you’re trying to lose weight, but there are also other less obvious benefits, such as less hunger and a steady supply of energy. This may help keep you alert and focused.
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