That makes a lot of sense. Keeping up insulin pathways when you aren’t eating carbs would be like keeping the lights on when it’s daytime outside — it’s a waste of energy. You aren’t using insulin on keto, so your body probably downregulates your insulin pathways. As a refresher, insulin is a hormone produced by your pancreas that tells your cells to absorb glucose to use as fuel. When you eat carbs, insulin production begins. In the absence of carbs, there’s less need for insulin.
The keto diet is NOT what you seem to picture. I laughed at your description as I was eating lamb chops, cauliflower rice, broccoli, followed by cheesecake. How deprived I was! You should relook at what the diet really is. By the way, my cardiologist highly recommends keto. Most people see a drastic decrease in their triglyceride/HDL ratio. Looking at total cholesterol or LDL alone is 20 years out of date! Even the AHA has caught up, and now says that it’s NOT how heart health should be judged.

My pick for the healthiest meal plan for diabetes? My favorite is the Mediterranean Diet. It’s high in fiber, low in saturated fats and includes no processed foods which is the challenge for all of us at this point in history. If we could all eat like they do in Italy and Greece! Think of Sicily and the coasts of Greece where their diet consists of fresh fish, fresh fruits and vegetables, nuts, beans, seeds, olives and olive oil, lean meats such as chicken and pork, some eggs and little red meat. The American Heart Association recommends it as well as the American Diabetes Association as being one healthy diet choice for people with diabetes.
This was simply the best response to this article. The doctor who wrote it has no idea of the life changing benefits of keto. Bravo to you for speaking up. Congratulations on reversing your diabetes. I dont have diabetes and am not obese but I switched to keto to live a longer healthier life. I’ve never felt better. Must mention that I am 32. I want to prevent disease. Let the food be the medicine.
Salmon boasts significant anti-inflammatory properties thanks to its rich omega-3 fatty acid content, meaning it’s an excellent source of protein for those looking to jumpstart their weight loss. In fact, one study that examined the effects of weight loss and seafood consumption showed wild salmon to be the most effective at reducing inflammation—better than lean white fish and a fish-free diet. According to a study published in The Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, fishy fatty acids may also signal thyroid cells in the liver to burn more fat.
Net carbs is simply total carbs minus fiber and non-digestible sugar alcohols, like erythritol. (This doesn’t apply to high glycemic sugar alcohols, like maltitol.) We don’t have to count fiber and certain sugar alcohols in net carbs, because they either don’t get broken down by our bodies, are not absorbed, or are absorbed but not metabolized. (Read more about sugar alcohols here.)

The first meta-analysis worth noting collected the data from 10 randomized trials comprising 1376 participants in total. [14] After analyzing the research, a key relationship emerged between dietary carbs and blood sugar levels. In short, the researchers described their finding thus: “the greater the carbohydrate restriction, the greater glucose lowering…” [14]
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If you’re looking to get a jump start on your health and fitness goals this year, you may be thinking about trying the ketogenic diet. Maybe you’ve heard the phrase before — it’s a huge diet buzzword — but aren’t sure what it means. Here’s a primer: The ketogenic diet is an eating plan that drives your body into ketosis, a state where the body uses fat as a primary fuel source (instead of carbohydrates), says Stacey Mattinson, RDN, who is based in Austin, Texas.
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