The DASH diet, the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension diet, is mainly used to lower blood pressure and cholesterol, but it may also help you to lose weight. This diet emphasizes the consumption of foods that are low in cholesterol and saturated fat. It encourages eating a lot of fruit, vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat dairy foods. If you are looking to lose weight with the DASH diet, all you need to do is understand how the diet is structured and modify the diet to suit your weight loss needs. You will start seeing results in a few weeks to months’ time.[1]
Cons: In our experience, capping your calories low will probably mean a lot of internal strife and stress. Plus, we’re big fans of enjoying food instead of fearing it, and 800 calories doesn’t leave much room for satisfied taste buds. Lastly, if you’re currently eating double to triple this amount of food, dropping to a daily caloric intake this low can tank your metabolism and actually slow weight loss more than switching to one of these other diets might. (Curious? Here’s why starving yourself won’t help you lose weight.)
Keto decreases inflammation and improves brain function — so much so that Alzheimer’s patients who switch to a keto diet actually begin to recover their brain function, which up until now was unheard of.[20][21][22][23][24] So there’s that. (Dale Bredesen and Mark Hyman have discussed these on the Bulletproof Radio podcast. Check out Dale’s episode here, and Mark’s here.)  
If you ate a hearty breakfast, you won’t be hungry until lunch. It’s best to brown-bag it because you can control the ingredients and portions, but if you eat out, look for grilled fish and salad as a menu option. Don’t eat at your desk while writing a report, but go to the park with a friend or join your co-workers in the lunch room. Bringing leftovers is also a good lunch option.
First, a little background: Eric Westman, MD, director of the Duke Lifestyle Medical Clinic, explained to Health in a previous interview that in order to successfully follow the keto diet, you need to eat moderate amounts of protein, reduce your carb intake, and increase fats. When you reduce your carb consumption, your body turns to stored fat as its new fuel source—a process called ketosis. To stay in ketosis, followers of the keto diet must limit their carbs to 50 grams a day, Dr. Westman says.
Need more tips to follow the DASH diet? You'll find a free guide that is full of meal plans, DASH diet food lists and recipes at the National Institutes of Health website. You'll also find a 7-day DASH Diet Eating Plan that guides you through a full week's worth of meals. If you want more help, there are other DASH diet guides online and DASH diet books that are available for purchase. 
Thanks for posting this Edward. While I agree that the thought of a lifetime without any sweets or any grains sounds miserable, it’s even more miserable every time I see a number above 120 on my meter, which is guaranteed to happen every time I eat even a few bites of one of those foods. Yeah, it’s stressful (and cortisol is just as much of a pain as T2D), but I want a better life and a life off of drugs. I was on three orals and two shots of insulin daily.
The DASH Diet Weight Loss Solution is the only book with the powerful low-carb version of DASH. Based on the newest research, this plan is more powerful than the original DASH diet for lowering blood pressure and boosting weight loss, and perfect for people with type 2 diabetes, who need to limit refined carbs. For a vegetarian or mostly-vegetarian version, my new book, The DASH Diet Younger You, will help you become healthier, fitter, and younger from the inside out. And, I am pleased to share my cookbook, The Everyday DASH Diet Cookbook, which is the only cookbook specifically designed to complement the lower-carb plan from The DASH Diet Weight Loss Solution. These books will make it so easy stay on track with your DASH diet plan.
Prior to the advent of exogenous insulin for the treatment of diabetes mellitus in the 1920's, the mainstay of therapy was dietary modification. Diet recommendations in that era were aimed at controlling glycemia (actually, glycosuria) and were dramatically different from current low-fat, high-carbohydrate dietary recommendations for patients with diabetes [1,2]. For example, the Dr. Elliot Joslin Diabetic Diet in 1923 consisted of "meats, poultry, game, fish, clear soups, gelatin, eggs, butter, olive oil, coffee, tea" and contained approximately 5% of energy from carbohydrates, 20% from protein, and 75% from fat [3]. A similar diet was advocated by Dr. Frederick Allen of the same era [4].
102 of these subjects had type 2 diabetes. The subjects were divided into two groups: one consumed a low-calorie diet (LCD) while the other consumed a low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (LCKD). Both also underwent equal exercise and nutritional training. Every four weeks, the researchers measured levels of waist circumference, blood glucose level, levels of glycosylated hemoglobin, and triglycerides.
I started on a strict keto diet one year ago, and it has been the easiest diet I have ever been on. I was prediabetic before the diet, and now am not. My triglycerides are lower ( in normal range) and my good cholesterol is high. I am at lower than normal risk for heart disease because of my cholesterol ratios. I was not overweight to start with, am not now….and have not changed my weight at all. So the good effects are due solely to the diet change and not weight loss, which the author implies throughout the article that it is the weight loss that causes the good effects….not so. I am a veterinarian and believe in good medicine. This diet makes sense biochemically for those with diabetes or prediabetes.
Enter the DASH diet. When individuals followed this eating plan, researchers saw dramatic reductions in blood pressure levels. Today, the eating plan is recommended for preventing and treating hypertension and heart disease—and it has been linked to decreased bone deterioration, improved insulin sensitivity, and possible risk reduction for some cancers.
Several comprehensive studies and meta-analyses have demonstrated that after a few months or even a year of a low carb diet versus a moderate/high carb diet, there are no significant differences in the amount of weight lost (2,3,4,5).  I will say, however, most of these diets are NOT keto and are simply lower carb (i.e. 20%).  Also, long-term effects (beyond 1 year) are not often studied due to budgetary constraints, so interpret results as you wish.

Con: Results can vary depending on how much fluid you drink. By drinking more water, you dilute the concentration of ketones in the urine and thus a lower level of ketones will be detected on the strips. The strips don’t show a precise ketone level. Finally, and most importantly, as you become increasingly keto-adapted and your body reabsorbs ketones from the urine, urine strips may become unreliable, even if you’re in ketosis.
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